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Queensland's deputy premier slams NSW for 'going rogue'

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49272333 10100193 Queensland Deputy Premier Steven Miles pictured on Sunday said N a 47 1634443970559

The deputy premier of Queensland has fired shots at NSW for ‘going rogue’ and not following the national reopening plan once vaccination targets are met.

Deputy Premier Steven Miles announced at a press conference on Sunday that 72 per cent of Sunshine State residents have had their first dose of a Covid vaccine, with no new infections recoded overnight.

When asked what would happen when the state reaches its 70 or 80 per cent double-dosed milestones, Mr Miles said the government was ‘still working those details through’.

He told reporters that Queensland authorities are committed to the national plan that says states can start opening up on November 14, once they reach vaccine targets – the same national plan he said NSW leaders ‘abandoned’. 

Queensland Deputy Premier Steven Miles (pictured on Sunday) said NSW leaders went abandoned the national reopening plan

‘The prime minister’s so-called national plan is in tatters now, thanks to his buddy in NSW going off script, going rogue,’ Mr Miles said.  

NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet appeared to take the federal government by surprise on Friday when he declared that vaccination international arrivals would be allowed to enter his state without any form of quarantine from November 1 – two weeks ahead of the national plan.

‘We can’t live here in a hermit kingdom,’ the premier said. 

‘We’ve got to open up, and this decision today is a big one, but it is the right one to get NSW connected globally.’ 

Last week, Premier Dominic Perrottet declared that vaccination international arrivals would be allowed to enter his state without any form of quarantine from November 1. Pictured: People gathering at the races in Sydney on October 16 amid eased restrictions

Last week, Premier Dominic Perrottet declared that vaccination international arrivals would be allowed to enter his state without any form of quarantine from November 1. Pictured: People gathering at the races in Sydney on October 16 amid eased restrictions

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Restrictions have been eased in NSW, with only 301 new Covid cases announced on Sunday morning

Prime Minister Scott Morrison was quick to smack the announcement down and said international arrivals would be limited to Australian citizens who have had both jabs.

‘We are not opening up to everyone coming back to Australia at the moment,’ he said.

‘I want to be clear about that. We will take this forward in stages as we have done in all these things. It is for the commonwealth and federal government to decide when the border opens and shuts at an international level and we will do that.’

The national leader also said NSW was able to drift away from the plan because more than 80 per cent of the state is fully-vaccinated, and 91 per cent of residents have had their first dose. 

On Friday, NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet (pictured) said Australians can't ' live here in a hermit kingdom'

On Friday, NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet (pictured) said Australians can’t ‘ live here in a hermit kingdom’

Mr Miles told reporters on Sunday that people in NSW likely raced out to get the jab because it was the only way harsh lockdowns would be lifted.

So far, about 52 per cent of Sunshine State residents have had both doses of a Covid vaccine. 

The premier said he had ‘some confidence’ that Queensland would reach the 80 per cent threshold soon, adding: ‘I would love to see the border open by Christmas’. 

‘We just need Queenslanders to come out and get vaccinated,’ Mr Miles said.

‘The sooner we can get Queenslanders vaccinated the sooner we can adjust restrictions.’

Mask rules are still in place in Queensland, along with capacity limits for venues, outdoor events, and inside homes.

Last week, visiting restrictions lifted for hospitals, aged care and correctional facilities. 

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UK Court Convicts Nigerian Involved In Romance Scam Targeting Over 670 People

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5 Law and Justice concept Mallet of the judge books scales of justice

A Nigerian man, Osagie Aigbonohan, was on Friday convicted by the Southwark Crown Court, United Kingdom over his involvement in a romance scam in which he conned several women out of thousands of pounds. 

This was made known in a statement issued on Saturday by the National Crime Agency.

The 40-year-old Nigerian was said to have used a number of aliases to contact women online through dating and social media sites, and in one case cheated a woman out of nearly £10,000 (about N7.5million at the parallel market). 

According to the statement, Aigbonohan used the name ‘Tony Eden’, after which he struck up a ten-month relationship with the victim in 2020, via a dating site and persuaded her to lend him money to buy machinery for his business overseas.

The victim reportedly made nine transfers into various accounts operated by the Nigerian under fake identities, with the money eventually being sent into a personal account held by Aigbonohan, which he used for everyday spending.

Also, data recovered from Aigbonohan’s phone showed that he received money from at least eight other victims and had been in contact with over 670 people in total.

The statement said one of the victims was terminally ill, but Aigbonohan continued to pursue her even after she had passed away.

He was arrested in July 2021 and a false driver’s license was found on him at the time. Also it was discovered that he had no legal right to be in the UK, having overstayed his visa from two years ago.

Records showed that despite living in Abbey Wood, London, the Nigerian will spend victim’s money in locations across London, Manchester and Glasgow.

NCA officer’s conducted a search on the culprit’s residence where they found a footwear he had purchased with store vouchers that could be linked back to one of the victims.

Aigbonohan was said to have appeared before Southwark Crown Court on Friday, where he pleaded guilty to charges relating to fraud and money laundering.

He will remain in custody until he is sentenced at the same court on 14 January 2022.

Dominic Mugan, NCA Operations Manager, said: “Romance fraud is a particularly cruel crime that impacts victims both emotionally and financially, with victims often feeling like they’re the ones to blame.

“Aigbonohan showed total disregard for the victims in this case and was happy to commit further fraud by moving money between various fraudulently held accounts.

“It’s possible that he contacted more people than we know about, if you think you may have been a victim, or may be a victim in a similar case, we would urge you to report the details to Action Fraud.”

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Democracy, good governance and the national integration, By Kayode Fayemi

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2 Regaining the Legacy scaled e1614180145581

As a site and in its uses after the passing of its occupant, Mambayya House serves the important purpose of celebrating that inimitable champion of the working poor, the late Mallam Aminu Kano. The popular name by which the place is known, namely Mambayya House, is derived from the nickname of his late mother. The Sa’adu Zungur Auditorium in which this lecture is taking place is named after one of the close political associates and faithful fellow travellers of Mallam Aminu Kano. Mambayya House, therefore, brims with multiple symbolisms centered on all that the late Mallam Aminu Kano meant to us and our country. You will understand, therefore, that as we mark the 21st anniversary of the House, it is appropriate to remember the life and times of Mallam Aminu and pay justified tribute to his memory.

Born on the 9th of August 1930, and as an early beneficiary of both Quaranic and Western education, Mallam, as he came to be known affectionately, very quickly carved a niche for himself as the pre-eminent voice and champion of the talakawa – that mass of peasants, the urban working poor, and the déclassé. His emergence and growth into this role emanated from a deep-seated set of values that he embraced and honed at an early stage in his political career, and held on to tenaciously for the rest of his life.

Concerned by the reported excesses that were built into the colonially-licensed native authority system and convinced that the system needed to be overturned in order for the talakawa to be able to have a fighting chance to lead a decent and dignified life free of oppression, he committed himself to organising the mass of the people to exercise their agency to imagine and create an alternative political order. The principal agency through which he did this was the movement which he helped to found in 1950 and which was named the Northern Elements Progressive Union (NEPU). The establishment of NEPU was to mark a significant milestone in the history of political radicalism in Nigeria. The tradition of radicalism which it represented was carried over into the late 1970s and beyond by the People’s Redemption Party (PRP), which Mallam Aminu Kano also led.

Much of the history of the early political life and exploits of Mallam and the NEPU will be familiar to this audience and has been amply documented and dissected by at least two generations of scholars. Easily among the most thorough and illuminating is the book by the frontline political scientist, Professor A.D. Yahaya, who transited into eternity a few weeks ago but whose legacy lives on through his writings – such as The Native Authority System in Northern Nigeria 1950 -1970‬ – and the two generations of students he mentored and inspired.

Given that Mambayya House was mandated and endowed by the authorities of Bayero University to preserve the memory and legacy of the late Mallam Aminu Kano through research and training on democratic governance writ large, you will allow me to draw a few lessons of his life experience and political career, which I find to be an enduring part of his contribution to our nation and of relevance to our contemporary circumstances as a people.

The first point I would like to raise, and one which has found recurring resonance with me, is the life of principles, courage of conviction, enduring commitment to a just cause, and consistency in public service. For much of his life, despite the fickle and slippery terrain of politics, and against various odds, Mallam stood by his principles and convictions. More than that, he organised within the realms of democratic politics to defend his principles and mobilise for his convictions. The courage and consistency he projected at all times won him the respect of his opponents and critics, and the undiluted respect and adulation of the masses. In this, our very own Mallam Aminu Kano stood shoulder to shoulder with the likes of Kwame Nkrumah, Ahmed Sekou Toure, Ahmed Ben Bella, and other icons of African liberation from the shackles of colonial rule. The NEPU he led shared many similar attributes with Nkrumah’s Convention Peoples’ Party.

Flowing out of my first point is a second related one: For all the political influence and power which he came to enjoy once it became clear that his movement was not going to fade out or be destroyed by its rivals, Mallam stood out in our entire post-colonial experience as the very anti-thesis of money politics. The weight of the man across Nigeria, generally, and northern Nigeria. in particular, did not depend on his ability to dole out tons of money to his followers and fellow-travellers but, rather, the trust and the faith they had in him as the honest, indefatigable, and reliable torch bearer of their interests, whom they could trust at all times. There is something in this for all of us who are practicing politicians today.

The third point I would like to make about the life and legacy of Mallam centres on the important place of ideas and ideology in his entire political engagement. Mallam built his emancipatory politics around a clear set of ideas and an ideology of empowerment for the talakawa that left no one in doubt as to what he stood for and represented. In this regard, the Sawaba Declaration of December 1950, which he issued, marked an historic milestone in his ideological journey, delineating him and his partisans from the more mainstream sections of the rapidly growing nationalist movement for self-rule and independence in Nigeria.

At a time when we seem to have increasingly relegated ideas and ideology to the background, the experience and example of Mallam serves as a poignant reminder to us that there once was a time in our national history when ideas drove political choice and affiliation. Those times can still be reinvented if we stand ready to pause for a bit and learn from the likes of Mallam Aminu Kano, especially in these testy and treacherous times in our national history when we are in need of a constant flow of fresh and refreshing ideas for our national rebirth and advancement.

A fourth point I have drawn out of the life experience of Mallam Aminu Kano for our edification and re-education in these times is the central place of modesty and moderation in the making of a successful servant-leader. All through his life, from his abode here in Mambayya House and the high density Gwamajja Quarters in which it is located, to his dress code, his offices, and his worldly goods, Mallam was the epitome of modesty, simplicity, and moderation. This, in turn, made him one of the most accessible leaders in our history to date. It also ensured that the masses easily identified with him as one of them.

The fifth and last point I would like to bring to our attention centres on the great store which Mallam set by the place and role of education in the making of personal dignity, social advancement, and nation-building. Whether it be by the open encouragement and calls which he made for the education of girls or the assistance he gave to his staff and followers to acquire education, including, if necessary, self-education, he understood the liberating power of learning and the acquisition of knowledge and skills in the empowerment of a people and the making of a nation.

For someone who was trained as a teacher and who also practiced the profession for a period of time, his strong interest in the liberating power of education should probably not be surprising. However, for Mallam Aminu Kano, education was also a weapon for emancipation and he encouraged it in the conviction that it was a necessary tool for self-actualisation and societal progress. Little wonder then that he started his political activism with his central role in the formation of the Northern Teachers Association.

In his time, as recounted by Dr Jibrin Ibrahim, one of his young political assistants, Dr A.U. Jalingo, who later went on to become a Senior Lecturer and role model in the Department of Political Science in this University, told of the experience whereby Mallam invested his time between political meetings to teach some of his personal staff who hadn’t been to school to read and write. That was a mark of just how important education was to him. And it is a sector to which we must devote a considerable amount of attention anew in our continued quest for the combination of workable policies that will enable us, once and for all, to turn the table of underdevelopment in Nigeria.

Policies designed to advance agendas of state- and nation-building or strengthening democratic governance demand that we take to heart the kinds of social concerns that were at the centre of the worldview and politics of Mallam Aminu Kano. These policies must be premised on the starting point, which he knew so well, that no political order can endure where majority of its members wallow in abject poverty and exist in a state of disempowerment. And this is why, in the midst of our debates about the National Question and the various options for restructuring the polity, we must remind ourselves that there are underlying social questions that urgently require to be addressed as well. For the crisis of Nigerian nationhood with which we are presently grappling is not simply reducible only to competing ethnicities or religiosities, it is also about a crisis of social livelihoods.

Every political system derives its legitimacy and is held together by the investment which is made in the empowerment of the citizenry and the protection of their welfare and wellbeing. Citizen empowerment, as articulated by the generation of Mallam Aminu Kano, was structured – correctly – around the provision through public policy, of the basic tools by which individuals and groups could advance themselves in life. This is why at independence, across Nigeria, there was a significant investment in the educational and health sectors that are at the heart of social policy. Healthy citizens equipped with the requisite skills and knowledge could not only get employment but also create employment. No wonder then that in the first two decades of our independence, in tandem with and flowing from public social policy investments, Nigerians enjoyed a phase of generalised upward mobility in their lives.

Following the onset of economic crisis in the period from the early 1980s, and as a direct result of some of the austerity measures that had to be put in place, the social expenditures of governments at all levels of the federal system suffered a broad-ranging retrenchment. The structural adjustment measures that were subsequently introduced exacerbated a worsening social situation that effectively eroded the social contract underpinning the country’s governance. This is the background to our slide into the ranks of the countries around the world that harbour the highest number of working poor and those excluded outright. Massive and long-term unemployment, especially among our youth, growing social inequality in the country, and the overall thinning out of the middle class are among some of the challenges that steer us in the face everyday.

TEXEM

It does not take a magician to see that we are confronted with a highly combustible cocktail of mass poverty, mass unemployment, and massive inequalities that are already generating various discontents in insurgencies, criminality, banditry, and various extremisms. I want to submit that taking determined and bold steps to address these social problems head on is as urgent and crucial as the energies we may be required to devote to recalibrating and updating the structures of our federal system. To do so meaningfully, we cannot avoid offering Nigerians a new social bargain around which we can rebuild citizenship, national identity, and the legitimacy of the state. Nigeria and Nigerians need a new Sawaba Declaration that will constitute our collectively-shared national manifesto of emancipation from poverty, unemployment, inequality, marginalisation, and generalised unemployment.

Thinking through what a new social compact for Nigeria might be, we can borrow a leaf from the late Mallam Aminu Kano and resolve that as part and parcel of the bargain of being a citizen of Nigeria, we will strive to design universal social policies that will enable the generality of our people to renew their faith in the country and their government. Universal access to education should be accompanied by a system of universal health care. It should be underpinned with a national strategy that defines employment creation as a priority concern of public policy. Enhanced efforts at boosting domestic resource mobilisation will need to be accompanied by deliberate measures at redistribution designed to reduced wealth, income, gender, and inter-generational inequalities.

Beyond these broad categories of what the new Sawaba Declaration should focus on, I would like to argue that those of us who believe that a new Nigeria is possible must get to work quickly on the comprehensive development of this social compact, one which must elevate the dignity of the human person and promote the principles of common good, solidarity, stewardship, subsidiariaty in the functioning of government, active participation of the citizenry, rights and responsibilities, economic justice as well as peace and security. This should be the manifesto that we collectively work on to address the existential threats to the survival and thriving of the Nigerian state.

When the generation of the late Mallam Aminu Kano was faced with what the historic Sawaba Declaration described as “the shocking state of social order”, they summoned the courage to organise themselves to proffer alternatives that they felt would allow for a social redress. The new Sawaba Declaration which we must produce in order to tackle the myriad of discords and discontents afflicting us today must, it seems to me, aim at nothing less than the rebuilding of the social policy anchor of the Nigerian state. On this occasion of the 21st anniversary of Mambayya House, we owe ourselves nothing less. We owe the memory of the late Mallam Aminu Kano nothing less. Let us rise up to the call as a people determined, in unity and a shared hope, to take a giant leap forward.

In conclusion, please allow me to return to Mallam Aminu Kano’s oft quoted saying in Hausa.

”Najeriya daya ce, amma kowa ya san gidan uban shi.”

Coming from a top and early nationalist who actively participated in the decolonisation of Nigeria, and, indeed, of Africa, we owe it to ourselves, and to him, to pause and ask what the great sage and inimitable scholar mean by this powerful, short, pithy, and memorable statement? –

It is my firm conviction that these words of wisdom are a clear message of guidance to us Nigerians, on unity in diversity and on national. Integration. But he spoke to an integration that is content laden, not one of empty rhetoric. It is an enduring call reminding all of us that though by God’s design we all come from somewhere, “gidajen ubannin mu” (our various fathers’ houses, our primary areas of extraction), nevertheless, we must, at all times, ensure national cohesion and unity, without which peace and progress will never be achieved.

It is my conviction that the best way to honour the memory of this teacher, philosopher, mentor, father, political activist, organizer extraordinary, and patriot par excellence is to continue to organise to successfully achieve national integration on the basis of social justice, fairness and equity.

Kayode Fayemi is governor of Ekiti State, Nigeria.

This is the text of the lecture delivered on the occasion of the 21st anniversary of Mambayya House at Sa’adu Zungur Auditorium Complex, Mambayya House, Kano State on Saturday, December 04.

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Republican Bob Dole, World War II hero and former US Senator, dies at 98

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Republican Bob Dole, above in 2016, represented his home state of Kansas in both chambers of Congress for decades. A decorated veteran who was seriously wounded during World War II, the longtime US Senator ran for president in 1996 but lost to incumbent Bill Clinton, a Democrat

Republican presidential nominee Bob Dole, who valiantly fought during World War II and then represented his home state of Kansas as a powerful US Senator for decades, has died at 98. 

Born into a working-class family in Russell, Kansas in 1923, the future senate majority leader paused his university studies to enlist in the army after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Dole would earn two Purple Hearts and a Bronze Star for his service.

In April 1945, Nazis shot Dole in the right shoulder during a fight in the hills of Italy. Given little odds to pull through, it took years for him to recover and his right arm was permanently disabled. Dole was always seen in public holding a pen in his right hand to discourage people from shaking it.  

The decorated veteran entered politics in 1950 by winning a two-year term in the state’s legislature. He then served as Russell County’s prosecuting attorney for eight years until he made the jump to the US House of Representatives in 1961. Starting in 1969, he represented Kansas in the US Senate. During his long and influential tenure in upper chamber, Dole was a Republican party leader who reached across the aisle to broker deals and served as majority leader. 

In 1976, President Gerald Ford picked Dole as his running mate but they lost to the Democratic ticket of Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale. Dole vied for the Republican presidential nomination twice – in 1980 and 1988 – before finally securing it in 1996. After resigning from the Senate to focus on his campaign, Dole lost to incumbent Bill Clinton, a Democrat. 

Dole married his first wife, Phyllis Holden, in 1948 and they have a daughter together, Robin, who was born in 1954. The couple divorced in 1972, and he met and then married Elizabeth Hanford in 1975. Elizabeth Dole has served in three Republican administrations and was also a US Senator representing North Carolina from 2003 until 2009.

On February 18, Dole announced that he had stage four lung cancer. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth, and his daughter, Robin.  

From 1969 until 1996, Dole served in the US Senate where he was a leader of his party, held powerful positions such as majority leader, and was a skilled negotiator to get legislation passed. He resigned from the Senate to focus on his presidential campaign. Above, Dole and his wife, Elizabeth, at a welcoming rally in San Diego during his run for the White House in 1996. The couple had come to the city for the race's last debate. Dole chose Jack Kemp, who had served nine terms in the US House of Representatives, as his running mate but they lost to the Democratic ticket of Clinton and Al Gore, then vice president

From 1969 until 1996, Dole served in the US Senate where he was a leader of his party, held powerful positions such as majority leader, and was a skilled negotiator to get legislation passed. He resigned from the Senate to focus on his presidential campaign. Above, Dole and his wife, Elizabeth, at a welcoming rally in San Diego during his run for the White House in 1996. The couple had come to the city for the race’s last debate. Dole chose Jack Kemp, who had served nine terms in the US House of Representatives, as his running mate but they lost to the Democratic ticket of Clinton and Al Gore, then vice president

Dole, above, in uniform in an undated photograph. He was a student at the University of Kansas when bombs fell on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 and the United States entered World War II. He enlisted the next year. Dole started active duty in the summer of 1943. He was deployed to Italy as a second lieutenant in the Army's 10th Mountain Division late the next year. In April 1945, his company was fighting to take Hill 913 - northwest of Florence - from the Nazis when they came under heavy gunfire from the Germans

Dole, above, in uniform in an undated photograph. He was a student at the University of Kansas when bombs fell on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 and the United States entered World War II. He enlisted the next year. Dole started active duty in the summer of 1943. He was deployed to Italy as a second lieutenant in the Army’s 10th Mountain Division late the next year. In April 1945, his company was fighting to take Hill 913 – northwest of Florence – from the Nazis when they came under heavy gunfire from the Germans

'I could see my platoon's radioman go down... After pulling his lifeless form into the foxhole, I scrambled back out again. As I did, I felt a sharp sting in my upper right back,' Dole wrote in his 1988 autobiography. That sharp sting was a bullet that tore through his right shoulder. A fellow soldier pulled him back to the American lines. Dole was given morphine but wasn't expected to make it. Using Dole's own blood, his fellow soldier marked his forehead with an 'M' to indicate he had already been given a shot: a second dose would have been fatal. Above, Dole recovering at Percy Jones Army Hospital in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1945

‘I could see my platoon’s radioman go down… After pulling his lifeless form into the foxhole, I scrambled back out again. As I did, I felt a sharp sting in my upper right back,’ Dole wrote in his 1988 autobiography. That sharp sting was a bullet that tore through his right shoulder. A fellow soldier pulled him back to the American lines. Dole was given morphine but wasn’t expected to make it. Using Dole’s own blood, his fellow soldier marked his forehead with an ‘M’ to indicate he had already been given a shot: a second dose would have been fatal. Above, Dole recovering at Percy Jones Army Hospital in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1945

Robert Joseph Dole was born on July 22, 1923 in Russell, Kansas. His father, Dorian Ray, worked at a facility that stored grain, and his mother, Bina, sold sewing machines. The family of six, which included his brother Kenny and his two sisters, Gloria and Norma Jean, lived in a small house that a New York Times article pointed out was ‘quite literally the wrong side of the tracks.’ 

Religious, hardworking and poor, the family struggled like many during the Great Depression of the 1930s. ‘As a young man in a small town, my parents taught me to put my trust in God, not government, and never confuse the two,’ he said, according to Biography.com. 

At Russell High School, Dole was an athlete who was seen as handsome and popular, according to the Times profile, which was published as part of a series called Political Life in 1996. Dole was ‘noted mainly for his shyness around girls’ in the school newspaper about his class, according to the article. After graduating in 1941, Dole went to the University of Kansas with the goal of becoming a doctor. Like in high school, he was also on the college’s basketball, track and football teams.

But since 1939, the global battle to fight Nazi Germany raged and after the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the United States entered the war. At the age of 19, Dole enlisted in the US Army Reserve Corps in 1942.   

While Dole was rehabilitating, he met his first wife, Phyllis Holden, an occupational therapist, in 1948. They married soon after and had one daughter together, Robin, in 1954. Dole first ran for Congress in 1960. In the conservative Congressional district he sought to represent, the primary was key. To differentiate him from the other candidates, his wife Phyllis set to work making skirts for the 'Dolls for Dole.' On the skirts were 'applique elephants holding

While Dole was rehabilitating, he met his first wife, Phyllis Holden, an occupational therapist, in 1948. They married soon after and had one daughter together, Robin, in 1954. Dole first ran for Congress in 1960. In the conservative Congressional district he sought to represent, the primary was key. To differentiate him from the other candidates, his wife Phyllis set to work making skirts for the ‘Dolls for Dole.’ On the skirts were ‘applique elephants holding “Dole for Congress” signs in their trunks,’ according to a New York Times series in 1996. Above, Dole campaigns for Congress sometime in the 1960s

Robert Joseph Dole was born on July 22, 1923 in Russell, Kansas. His father, Dorian Ray, worked at a facility that stored grain, and his mother, Bina, sold sewing machines. 'My father missed only one day of work in 40 years,' Dole said, according to the Horatio Alger Association. 'My mother was a source of inspiration; sacrificing her comfort for others was a lifelong habit.' Above, Dole with his parents, Doran and Bina in 1968, which is the year he won his first Senate term after serving in the US House of Representatives since 1961

Robert Joseph Dole was born on July 22, 1923 in Russell, Kansas. His father, Dorian Ray, worked at a facility that stored grain, and his mother, Bina, sold sewing machines. ‘My father missed only one day of work in 40 years,’ Dole said, according to the Horatio Alger Association. ‘My mother was a source of inspiration; sacrificing her comfort for others was a lifelong habit.’ Above, Dole with his parents, Doran and Bina in 1968, which is the year he won his first Senate term after serving in the US House of Representatives since 1961

Dole was married to his first wife until they divorced in early 1972. That year, he met Elizabeth Hanford, a lawyer who would serve in three administrations and run for office herself. The pair met at his office on Capitol Hill, according to a Today interview. 'All of a sudden, the side door opens and in comes Bob Dole. And I look up and I think,

Dole was married to his first wife until they divorced in early 1972. That year, he met Elizabeth Hanford, a lawyer who would serve in three administrations and run for office herself. The pair met at his office on Capitol Hill, according to a Today interview. ‘All of a sudden, the side door opens and in comes Bob Dole. And I look up and I think, “Gee, he’s a good-looking guy.” And he says he wrote my name on the back of his blotter,’ Elizabeth said during the show. They married in December 1975 and are seen above on their wedding day

Dole started active duty in the summer of 1943 and was then deployed to Italy as a second lieutenant in the Army’s 10th Mountain Division late the next year. 

In April 1945, his company was fighting to take Hill 913 – northwest of Florence – from the Nazis when they came under heavy gunfire, including from a sniper, and were trapped by the hail of bullets and a minefield.  

‘Dole had to get that gunman. He selected a small group of men to help him take out the sniper and find a safer passage. As he climbed a rocky field, his radioman was hit,’ according to his 1996 presidential campaign website. 

‘I could see my platoon’s radioman go down… After pulling his lifeless form into the foxhole, I scrambled back out again. As I did, I felt a sharp sting in my upper right back,’ Dole wrote in his 1988 autobiography.

That sharp sting was a bullet that tore through his shoulder. ‘I lay face down in the dirt,’ Dole said, according to the campaign website. ‘I could not see or move my arms. I thought they were missing.’ 

Sergeant Frank Carafa bravely pulled the wounded Dole back. ‘They had a perfect field of fire,’ he told the Associated Press in 1995. The Germans ‘could have killed every person that went out on that field.’

Dole was given morphine but wasn’t expected to make it. Using Dole’s blood, a fellow soldier marked his forehead with an ‘M’ to indicate he had already been given a shot: a second dose would have been fatal.  

In 1968, Dole won his first Senate term after serving in the House - the same year Richard Nixon took the White House. Nixon tapped Dole to be the chairman of the Republican National Committee in 1971. During Nixon's second term, he resigned after the Watergate Scandal and Gerald Ford, right, became president in 1974. Ford chose Dole as his running mate and they are seen above at the 1976 Republican National Convention in Kansas City. The Democratic ticket of Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale defeated them

In 1968, Dole won his first Senate term after serving in the House – the same year Richard Nixon took the White House. Nixon tapped Dole to be the chairman of the Republican National Committee in 1971. During Nixon’s second term, he resigned after the Watergate Scandal and Gerald Ford, right, became president in 1974. Ford chose Dole as his running mate and they are seen above at the 1976 Republican National Convention in Kansas City. The Democratic ticket of Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale defeated them

Dole first sought the Republican presidential nomination during the 1980 election but soon bowed out. Republican Ronald Reagan won the White House for two terms. He again pursued the nomination in 1988, but George H W Bush, Reagan's vice president, won the nomination and the presidency. Bush lost to Democrat Bill Clinton in 1992. Dole secured the nomination in 1996 and took on Clinton. Above, supporters cheer Dole at a rally in March 1996

Dole first sought the Republican presidential nomination during the 1980 election but soon bowed out. Republican Ronald Reagan won the White House for two terms. He again pursued the nomination in 1988, but George H W Bush, Reagan’s vice president, won the nomination and the presidency. Bush lost to Democrat Bill Clinton in 1992. Dole secured the nomination in 1996 and took on Clinton. Above, supporters cheer Dole at a rally in March 1996

Above, First Lady Hillary Clinton, Chelsea Clinton, President Bill Clinton, Dole, the Republican nominee, his wife Elizabeth and his daughter Robin after a presidential debate on October 6, 1996. Two years earlier, there was a 'Republican Revolution' in which the party made substantial gains and won control of both houses of Congress during the midterm elections in November 1994. Momentum was believed to be on the side of the Republicans but with a strong economy, Clinton, the incumbent, prevailed

Above, First Lady Hillary Clinton, Chelsea Clinton, President Bill Clinton, Dole, the Republican nominee, his wife Elizabeth and his daughter Robin after a presidential debate on October 6, 1996. Two years earlier, there was a ‘Republican Revolution’ in which the party made substantial gains and won control of both houses of Congress during the midterm elections in November 1994. Momentum was believed to be on the side of the Republicans but with a strong economy, Clinton, the incumbent, prevailed

Dole did survive but was seriously wounded and temporarily paralyzed. But the 22-year-old persevered and eventually after the paralysis subsided, he was able to relearn simple tasks using his left arm due to the damage to his right. 

His road to recovery was long but it was while he was recuperating that he met his first wife, Phyllis Holden, an occupational therapist. She saw him across the cafeteria at the Percy Jones Army Medical Center in March 1948. ‘He was handsome, with dark, penetrating eyes and shiny hair – and because his right arm was up in a sling,’ she told The Spokesman-Review in 1996 about why she noticed him.

At a party soon after, Dole asked her dance. Three months later, they were married, according to the article.

For a short period, the couple moved back to Russell and his fellow townspeople raised money – $1,800 in 1947 – for surgeries to straighten his right arm, according to the Times profile.

Dole went back to college, first at the University of Arizona before transferring to Washburn University in Topeka and switched his ambition from medicine to law. He then earned his undergraduate and law degrees. It was while he was in law school that he decided to enter politics and in 1950, he was elected to the state legislature. Four years later, his daughter, Robin, was born. 

After the two-year term, Dole was the county’s prosecuting attorney for eight years. By 1960, he was ready for a bigger stage and ran for Congress. 

In the conservative Congressional district, the primary was key. To differentiate him from the other candidates, his wife Phyllis set to work making skirts for the ‘Dolls for Dole.’ On the skirts were ‘applique elephants holding “Dole for Congress” signs in their trunks,’ according to the Times series.

Dole won his first term in the US House of Representatives and in 1961, the family split its time between Russell and Washington, DC. Phyllis told The Spokesman-Review that DC ‘was kind of scary for me.’

In 1968, after serving as a Congressman for eight years, Dole sought a Senate seat and won – the same year Richard Nixon took the White House. Nixon tapped Dole for Republican National Committee chairman in 1971. And while he traveled the country, Dole spent time away from his wife and daughter. The couple divorced in January 1972.

When asked about his accomplishments in the Senate, Dole told The New York Times: 'Just being there. I mean being in the United States Senate. I can't think of very many days I went to work without being a little excited. You see the Capitol dome and know that you're part of something that most people would give anything for. It's a great opportunity, and a great privilege.' Above, Dole after speaking to VFW members in Louisville, Kentucky during his run for the White House in 1996

When asked about his accomplishments in the Senate, Dole told The New York Times: ‘Just being there. I mean being in the United States Senate. I can’t think of very many days I went to work without being a little excited. You see the Capitol dome and know that you’re part of something that most people would give anything for. It’s a great opportunity, and a great privilege.’ Above, Dole after speaking to VFW members in Louisville, Kentucky during his run for the White House in 1996

In January 1997, President Clinton awarded Dole the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the country's highest civilian honor. 'Son of the soil, citizen, soldier and legislator, Bob Dole understands the American people, their struggles, their triumphs and their dreams,' Clinton said during the ceremony. 'Our country is better for his courage, his determination and his willingness to go the long course to lead America'

In January 1997, President Clinton awarded Dole the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the country’s highest civilian honor. ‘Son of the soil, citizen, soldier and legislator, Bob Dole understands the American people, their struggles, their triumphs and their dreams,’ Clinton said during the ceremony. ‘Our country is better for his courage, his determination and his willingness to go the long course to lead America’

Dole kisses his wife, Elizabeth, above, on November 5, 2002 after her electoral victory. Born in Salisbury, North Carolina in 1936, Elizabeth Dole served in Lyndon B Johnson, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan's administrations. A graduate of Harvard Law School, she ran for her native state's Senate seat in 2002. She won and was reelected in 2006. In 2012, she founded her namesake foundation dedicated to 'empowering, supporting, and honoring military and veteran caregivers,' according to the organization's Twitter page

Dole kisses his wife, Elizabeth, above, on November 5, 2002 after her electoral victory. Born in Salisbury, North Carolina in 1936, Elizabeth Dole served in Lyndon B Johnson, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan’s administrations. A graduate of Harvard Law School, she ran for her native state’s Senate seat in 2002. She won and was reelected in 2006. In 2012, she founded her namesake foundation dedicated to ’empowering, supporting, and honoring military and veteran caregivers,’ according to the organization’s Twitter page

After he lost the White House in 1996, Dole continued to advocate on the behalf of veterans. Above, Dole, who was then co-chair of a President's Commission on Care for America's Returning Wounded Warriors, speaks about the group's report as President George W Bush and Donna Shalala, left, then the Health and Human Services Secretary, listens in the Rose Garden in October 2007

After he lost the White House in 1996, Dole continued to advocate on the behalf of veterans. Above, Dole, who was then co-chair of a President’s Commission on Care for America’s Returning Wounded Warriors, speaks about the group’s report as President George W Bush and Donna Shalala, left, then the Health and Human Services Secretary, listens in the Rose Garden in October 2007 

But 1972 was also when he met his wife of 45 years: Elizabeth Hanford, a lawyer who would serve in three administrations and run for office herself. The pair met at his office on Capitol Hill, according to a Today interview from February 2019.

‘All of a sudden, the side door opens and in comes Bob Dole. And I look up and I think, “Gee, he’s a good-looking guy.” And he says he wrote my name on the back of his blotter,’ Elizabeth said during the show.

They went on their first date after talking on the phone and three years later they married in December 1975. ‘I love his compassionate heart. And the fact that he loved to feel that each day he could make a difference for at least one person in need,’ she told Today. ‘And I loved the fact that he had such a great sense of humor.’

Dole won reelection several times and served in the Senate for nearly three decades. Throughout his tenure, he led his party and was able ‘to maintain a unified Republican caucus, a job that grew increasingly difficult as the Senate grew more fractious and individual members more assertive,’ according to The New York Times series. With his reputation as a pragmatist and a dealmaker, Dole was able to work with Democrats. He was also a strong supporter and advocate for 1990’s American with Disabilities Act.

He was first elected the majority leader in 1984. Elizabeth told Today: ‘I got a miniature schnauzer from the Humane Society and walked into his national press conference with this little dog with a big sign ‘Leader’ around his neck, and presented him to Bob.’

Dole was majority leader again in 1995 but did not hold the position long. In 1996, after he secured the Republican presidential nomination, he resigned from the Senate to focus on his campaign. He had first sought the nomination in 1980 but quickly dropped out. George H W Bush beat him in 1988 when he vied for it again. 

During the midterm elections of 1994, there was a ‘Republican Revolution’: for the first time in 40 years, the party won both the House and the Senate. Many pointed to this momentum to push Democrat Bill Clinton out of the White House. Nonetheless, voters chose the incumbent and Dole lost.  

‘Sure, losing an election hurts, but I’ve experienced worse. And at an age when every day is precious, brooding over what might have been is self-defeating. In conceding the 1996 election, I remarked that ‘tomorrow will be the first time in my life I don’t have anything to do.’ I was wrong. Seventy-two hours after conceding the election, I was swapping wisecracks with David Letterman on his late-night show,’ Dole wrote in The Washington Post in 2012.

Dole was then a spokesman for Visa, Dunkin’ Donuts and Viagra, worked at law firm and as a lobbyist as well as founded the Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas. He also continued to work on behalf of veterans.

 In 1997, Clinton awarded Dole the Presidential Medal Freedom. 

‘At every stage of my life, I’ve been a witness to the greatness of this country,’ Dole said at the ceremony. ‘I have seen this nation overcome Depression and segregation and communism, turning back mortal threats to human freedom. And I have stood in awe of American courage and decency, a virtue so rare in history and so common in this precious place.’

'For a long time after my loss to Bill Clinton in 1996, I would lie awake nights wondering what I could have done to change the outcome,' Dole wrote in The Washington Post in 2012. 'Did we rely too much on the Republican base, letting cultural issues define us in a harsh light and driving away independents and suburban voters?' After the election, Dole was a spokesman for Visa, Dunkin' Donuts and Viagra. Above, Dole at an ASPCA's Fourth Annual Paws for Celebration pet adoption event in June 2015

‘For a long time after my loss to Bill Clinton in 1996, I would lie awake nights wondering what I could have done to change the outcome,’ Dole wrote in The Washington Post in 2012. ‘Did we rely too much on the Republican base, letting cultural issues define us in a harsh light and driving away independents and suburban voters?’ After the election, Dole was a spokesman for Visa, Dunkin’ Donuts and Viagra. Above, Dole at an ASPCA’s Fourth Annual Paws for Celebration pet adoption event in June 2015

Above, Dole salutes the casket of George H W Bush, the 41st President of the United States, in the US Capitol on December 4, 2018. Bush had died in Houston on November 30, 2018. Dole, who was using a wheelchair, rose to pay his respects to his former rival. The two men both ran for the Republican presidential nomination in 1980. Both were bested by Reagan, who won the nomination and chose Bush as his running mate. Dole dropped out. They met again in 1988 but then Vice President Bush was chosen as the candidate. Later on, in 1996, Bush supported Dole's run for the White House and spoke highly of him at that year's convention

Above, Dole salutes the casket of George H W Bush, the 41st President of the United States, in the US Capitol on December 4, 2018. Bush had died in Houston on November 30, 2018. Dole, who was using a wheelchair, rose to pay his respects to his former rival. The two men both ran for the Republican presidential nomination in 1980. Both were bested by Reagan, who won the nomination and chose Bush as his running mate. Dole dropped out. They met again in 1988 but then Vice President Bush was chosen as the candidate. Later on, in 1996, Bush supported Dole’s run for the White House and spoke highly of him at that year’s convention

Above, Vice President Mike Pence and President Donald Trump look on as Elizabeth Dole kisses her husband at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony in the Capitol rotunda to honor the former longtime Senator as a 'soldier, legislator, and statesman,' on January 17, 2018

Above, Vice President Mike Pence and President Donald Trump look on as Elizabeth Dole kisses her husband at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony in the Capitol rotunda to honor the former longtime Senator as a ‘soldier, legislator, and statesman,’ on January 17, 2018

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